Miracles in history

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In secular historical sources, Miracles occur throughout history and in many religions.

Notable examples[edit]

  • Roman emperor Vespasian cured a blind man and a lame man in AD 70. The event is recorded by Tacitus [1] and Suetonius.
  • Jean François Paul de Gondi's account in his Mémoires of the door keeper of Saragossa Cathedral having regained a leg. [2]
  • Many miracles witnessed by the tomb of François de Pâris around 1731. This led to the sect of the Convulsionnaires of Saint-Médard.
  • In Racine's history of the convent of Port-Royal, he records that the niece of the famous Pascal was healed of an fistula of the eye when touched by a sacred relic. [3]

Counter-Apologetics[edit]

Whether events like these above are real or not, they do not mean there is something supernatural or a god. See the article Miracles for more information and explanations.

References[edit]

  1. The Complete Works of Tacitus, tr. Church and Brodribb, 1942, Part 4, para. 81.
  2. Jean François Paul de Gondi, Mémoires [Memoirs], in Œuvres, ed. Marie-Therese Hipp and Michel Pernot (Paris: Gallimard, 1984). EHU Sect. 10.26.
  3. Mary Shelly, Lives of the Most Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of France

See also[edit]

External links[edit]