Evidentiary argument

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An evidentiary argument is an argument based on evidence. Evidentiary arguments can be used to argue for and against the existence of God.

Argument[edit]

In apologetics and counter-apologetics the argument usually goes as follows:

  • We should not believe in a proposition for which there is no evidence (i.e. evidentialism).
  • There is no evidence for the existence of God.
  • We should not believe in the existence of God.

Alternative version:

  • We should not believe in a proposition for which there are good reasons for not believing it.
  • There are good reasons for not believing in the existence of God.
  • We should not believe in the existence of God.

Counter-Arguments[edit]

Belief without evidence[edit]

Apologists sometimes argue that some beliefs may be held without evidence. The evidential argument itself implicitly assumes some beliefs are held without evidence, so evidentiary arguments is sometimes considered to be unsatisfactory by themselves.

Belief without evidence is sometimes justified on faith or as part of a presuppositional belief system. Typical arguments include:

Examples[edit]

For the existence of God[edit]

Against the existence of God[edit]